Tuesday, November 2, 2010

What are we defending?

The big topic in Singapore must be the way that ministers brush aside or simply find excuses for the meaningless influx of "foreign talents". I appreciate foreign workers because Singaporeans are not willing to slog under the hot sun for such a small sum of money. Not too many will be willing to work in coffeeshops.

Unfortunately there are many posts which can be and should be filled by locals but have been filled up by so called FTs as of late. Basically if you are not of middle to senior management grade then you will find it tough to fight against these foreign talents. They ask for less, work for more. And even if you paid thousands of dollars for a part-time Australian degree, you won't be better than them. Why? Because the SinGov gives out scholarships for Asean (less Singapore) students and these cream of the crop come to Singapore. Why are we pursuing these people? I have nothing to say if they are really the cream of everything but this is a scholarship battle which Singaporeans are not even eligible for.

I think this whole episode with the said minister coming out and saying his response was taken out of context and blah blah blah... And you know what? I don't really care what is said. I'm more concerned about what is done. In or out of context, things have been said and it's not helping their cause for the next General Elections. I forecast a 10% opposition win in the next GE. And a big stock market jolt~

Sometimes I find the way of the modern world digusting and retarded. UK paying millions and billions to be part of EU, have foreign immigrants leeching their labour system and housing refugees in million-pound mansions while their own citizens cannot afford to have a holiday in their life...

So back to the topic... so what is worth defending for in the Little Red Dot? Food, family, friends ... in that sequence~ LOL~ And of course little funny things like Singlish and PCK~



3 comments:

Razlan said...

Hmmm... you know what, I am one of the so-called FTs on the receiving end of an ASEAN scholarship from the Singapore government. I lived ten of my formative years in SG, six of which contributing to the economy and (of course!) taxes.

Contrary to the common conception, we the FTs do not always have it good. I started at the bottom of the barrel, scrapping leftovers, before rising in ranks. I have worked with both FTs and SGreans alike, and I think the key is to understand how different cultures work.

Having said that, I do think that to achieve 25% of SG population to be of foreigners is ridiculous.

WhiteDuskRed said...

Raz, do you think you had made a difference to the society in Singapore? Did you make a difference in the place you worked? If you did then I would say you are a success story of the Asean scholarship program.

However many Singaporeans (like myself) believe in meritocrary and somehow we feel discriminated upon in our own backyard when it comes to studies (scholarships) and jobs (jobs going to FTs).

But looking from further away one will realise that there are only so many scholarships given out a year but citizens do receive high-quality and heavily subsidized education.

Unfortunately many fellow Singaporeans cannot see things from as far away as me~

I would say 15% is a closer number... with the FT competition around who's going to have the time to give birth? Stress plays an important role on why so many fit and young Singaporeans cannot have babies~

Razlan said...

Making a difference to the society? Contributing to the company? Making lives of my SG friends better? Yes to all three. I wouldn't proclaim myself as one of the "success stores" of FT in SG. There are plenty of them who came, did what what they were told to do, hop over to another Western universities to get a higher title, higher salary.

The resource pool is limited to local Singaporeans, yes. But do we have that many Singaporeans deserving what the FT get? Probably so.

Hence my point about 1:4 ratio is crap. If that is not a recipe for disaster, I dunno what is!

Worldwide Visitors